Picture of Katherine D. McMahon

Katherine D. McMahon

Professor of Bacteriology
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Address: 1550 Linden Drive, Room 5552
Phone: (608) 890-2836
Lab Phone: (608) 890-2858
Email: trina.mcmahon@wisc.edu
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Overview · Lab · Publications · Lab Website

Start and Promotion Dates

  • Assistant Professor: 2003
  • Associate Professor: 2008
  • Full Professor: 2013

Education

BS 1995 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
MS 1997 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
PhD 2002 University of California at Berkeley

Research Overview

Microbes possess extraordinarily diverse and sophisticated physiologies, communication strategies, and mechanisms of evolution. Scientists and engineers are only beginning to understand and exploit the metabolic potential of these organisms and their communities. The broad objective of my research program is to improve our capacity to predict and model microbial behavior, while searching for novel biologically mediated transformations that can be harnessed for engineering applications.

My students and I study the microbial ecology of both natural and engineered systems. We use molecular tools to investigate microbial community structure and function in lakes and activated sludge. More recently, we have been using high-frequency environmental sensor networks to measure important variables that we know influence bacterial communities. Sensor data provided through the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (http://www.gleon.org) guides our adaptive sampling efforts and provides rich contextual data for our studies of lake bacterial community ecology. We are particularly interested in phosphorus as a nutrient driving eutrophication, and the role that bacteria play in phosphorus cycling. We are also engaged in metagenomic and post-genomic approaches to dissecting the metabolism of bacteria specialized in the sequestration of phosphorus in activated sludge. This information will ultimately lead to the construction of more predictive mechanistic and ecosystem-scale models to describe such processes as wastewater treatment and freshwater nutrient cycling.

Teaching

  • CEE 320: Environmental Engineering
  • Biocore 333: Biological Interactions
  • Microbiology 450: Diversity, Ecology, and Evolution of Microorganisms
  • CEE 629: Special Topics in Environmental Engineering

Activities

  • Trainer, Biotechnology Graduate Training Program
  • Member, Wisconsin Ecology Executive Committee
  • Women in Science and Engineering Residential College, past Co-Director
  • Chair, Graduate Admissions for Environmental Engineering Graduate Program
  • Member, Dane County Lakes and Watershed Commission
  • Member, Wisconsin Groundwater Advisory Council
  • Editorial Board, Environmental Microbiology
  • Editorial Board, Applied and Environmental Microbiology